?

Log in

A fascinating art. - Percy I. Weasley [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Percy I. Weasley

[ website | Nox ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

A fascinating art. [fév. 1er, 2005|09:49 pm]
Percy I. Weasley
[Humeur actuelle |optimisticoptimistic]

In between organising Committee matters and keeping things running as they should, I have recently become intrigued by the ancient art of Auguria, also known as a form of divination by observing the behavioural patterns of birds. Naturally, I am aware that there are those who may claim that this method of prediction is arcane or unreliable; however, the more I have looked into the history of this process, the more I feel as if it may be more of a lost art than anything.

Evidence of skilled augurs dates back as early as 300 B.C., though many of its modern enthusiasts consider Melora Waffling to have perfected it during the late 17th century, whence she penned a rather innovative guide. It sustained a period of popularity extending well into the early 1900's, after which it all but disappeared from common divination teachings. During this period, augury was highly regarded, as it was thought that birds were the creatures closest to the divinities-at-be and therefore well-suited to know precisely what the gods were intending.

Now, although it is clear that any species of bird may be interpreted in regards to these methods, what caught my attention (and furthermore, acted as a catalyst for my research) was the bizarre behaviour exhibited by my own western screech owl, Hermes, during the course of last week. Being that Hermes has been a constant companion since my 5th year of school, I do believe I can be trusted to know what consitutes a normal behavioural pattern for my owl in particular. His hunting and roosting schedule appears to have changed drastically within the past rather short period, and at first I believed these changes to be the result of either some sort of illness or the effects of some natural phenomenon. However, though I was rather concerned about this at the time, what furthered my delving into augury was the fact that the very day I had completed reading into avian medicine (alas, to no avail) what did I spy during my midday walk to the coffee shop but a particularly rare and elegant specimen of Emberiza hortulana.

Emberiza hortulana, commonly known as the Ortolan Bunting, is incredibly rare throughout the United Kingdom, let alone Central Muggle London. This being the case, I'm sure two incidents of unexplained and very bizarre avian behavioural exhibitions must amount to something. According to my Augurian reference books, this pattern clearly serves to predict a most favourable development in regards to my personal affairs, and perhaps even the conflicts ahead, which are sure to affect nearly every one of us.

I rather thought that this was an interesting bit of divination, indeed. And well, I suppose during these times of clashes and conflict, we could really all do with a bit of hope.
LienRépondre

Comments:
[User Picture]From: camerafancolin
2005-02-01 09:22 pm (UTC)
Wow!! That was the longest entry I've never read!!! You sure write a lot Percy!!!
(Répondre) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-01 09:27 pm (UTC)
That I do, Colin. I'm flattered.

How is your cephalopodic research coming along? I've always thought that squids were one of the most astonishing sea creatures.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: camerafancolin
2005-02-01 09:39 pm (UTC)
Cephalowho????
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-01 09:44 pm (UTC)
It's the class that includes squids and octopi.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: camerafancolin
2005-02-02 10:50 am (UTC)
Wow!! I didn't know that!! Thanks!
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-02 03:34 pm (UTC)
You're very welcome. Good luck!
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: dissirius
2005-02-02 12:00 am (UTC)
The best sort of divination is the sort that tells you things will go well.
(Répondre) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-02 08:50 am (UTC)
I'm quite fond of that notion myself, Mr Black.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: professorpenny
2005-02-02 03:04 am (UTC)
I hope that it does indeed come true.

Are you still ready for tea this afternoon?
(Répondre) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-02 08:47 am (UTC)
Most certainly, Penny dear. And from what the birds tell me, I'm sure it will be a great delight.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: professorpenny
2005-02-02 11:29 am (UTC)
I think that it will, too. I am always delighted by your company, dazzled even.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-02 03:33 pm (UTC)
You are far too kind.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: slytherinsqueen
2005-02-02 05:57 pm (UTC)
Now, that's interesting. I had thought that augury was that messy form of divination involving the entrails of slaughtered animals. Then again, I suppose I'm not surprised, as our Divination professor is hardly the sort to be precise with her teachings.
(Répondre) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: percyignatius
2005-02-02 06:10 pm (UTC)
Ah, I believe you may be referring to Hepatoscopy, which is a far more unsanitary-- and might I add, tasteless-- procedure. Indeed, I am a bit surprised that Augury was never covered during Divination lessons when I was in school, as it appears to be a far cleaner and more reliable method than many of the ones we were taught.

Alas, I suppose there isn't an incredible amount one can do on the matter.
(Répondre) (Parent) (Thread)